Tibetan character notes

Updated Wed 3 Dec 2014 • tags tibetan, scriptnotes

This page lists characters in Unicode's Tibetan block and provides information about them. For information about Tibetan script and its features in general, see the companion document Tibetan Script Notes.

To view this page as intended, you need a Tibetan font. Click the blue vertical bar at the bottom right of the page to apply other fonts, if you have them on your system. For transcriptions I recommend the excellent and free Doulos SIL font.

If you click on any red example text, you will see a list of the characters that make up the example appear at the bottom right of the page.

To find a character by codepoint, type #char0000 at the end of the URL in the address bar, where 0000 is a four-figure, hex codepoint number, all in uppercase.

Index

Click on a character in the table to jump to its description. Only characters with a line below have descriptive notes attached (apart from any descriptions in the Unicode database).

 

Syllable
Consonants
Subjoined consonants
Extensions for Balti
Dependent vowel signs
Vocalic modification
Transliteration head letters
Transliteration subjoined signs
Fixed-form subjoined consonants
Head marks
Paired punctuation
Marks and signs
Astrological signs
Cantillation signs
Symbols
Religious symbols
Annotation marks
Digits
Digits minus half

Syllable

U+0F00 TIBETAN SYLLABLE OM

Consonants

U+0F40 TIBETAN LETTER KA

Tibetan consonant

, eg, དཀར་པོ་ dkar-po karpo (white).

Used with subscripts, ཀྱ kja, ཀྲ tra, ཀླ la, སྐ ka.

Subjoined form is U+0F90 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER KA   ྐ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F41 TIBETAN LETTER KHA

Tibetan consonant

kʰá eg. ཁ་ཁེབ་ kha-kheb a-kʰep (cover).

Used with subscripts, ཁྱ kʰja, ཁྲ tʰra, ཁྭ ka.

Subjoined form is U+0F91 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER KHA   ྑ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F42 TIBETAN LETTER GA

Tibetan consonant

, kʰà

Used as a prefix with 11 consonants.

g when used as a suffix, eg. དག་ dag dag (I).

Used with subscripts, གྱ gja, གྲ dra, བླ la, གྭ ga.

Subjoined form is U+0F92 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER GA  ྒ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F43 TIBETAN LETTER GHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F42 0FB7

Tibetan consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0F42 TIBETAN LETTER GA and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Subjoined form is U+0F93 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER GHA  ྒྷ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p328, Daniels, p431-436

U+0F44 TIBETAN LETTER NGA

Tibetan consonant

ŋà

Used as a prefix with 11 consonants.

ŋ when used as a suffix.

Followed by tsek when it occurs before a shay, eg. དང༌།. Unicode Standard recommends use of U+0F0C TIBETAN MARK DELIMITER TSHEG BSTAR to prevent line breaks between the tsek and the shay.

Subjoined form is U+0F94 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER NGA  ྔ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F45 TIBETAN LETTER CA

Tibetan consonant

ʧá

Subjoined form is U+0F95 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER CA  ྕ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F46 TIBETAN LETTER CHA

Tibetan consonant

ʧʰá

Subjoined form is U+0F96 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER CHA  ྖ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F47 TIBETAN LETTER JA

Tibetan consonant

ʧà

Subjoined form is U+0F97 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER JA  ྗ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F49 TIBETAN LETTER NYA

Tibetan consonant

ɲà

Used with subscript ཉྭ ɲa.

Subjoined form is U+0F99 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER NYA  ྙ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F4A TIBETAN LETTER TTA

Tibetan consonant

Used for transcribing other languages, and also to distinguish foreign loan words from sequences of Tibetan syllables, eg. མོ་ཊ་ mo-ṭa (car).

The shape is a reversed version of U+0F4F TIBETAN LETTER TA .

Subjoined form is U+0F9A TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TTA  ྚ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F4B TIBETAN LETTER TTHA

Tibetan consonant

Used for transcribing other languages, and also to distinguish foreign loan words from sequences of Tibetan syllables.

The shape is a reversed version of U+0F50 TIBETAN LETTER THA .

Subjoined form is U+0F9B TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TTHA  ྛ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F4C TIBETAN LETTER DDA

Tibetan consonant

Used for transcribing other languages, and also to distinguish foreign loan words from sequences of Tibetan syllables, eg. ཁ་ཎ་ཌ་ kha-ṇa-ḍa (Canada).

The shape is a reversed version of U+0F51 TIBETAN LETTER DA .

Subjoined form is U+0F9C TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DDA  ྜ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F4D TIBETAN LETTER DDHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F4C 0FB7

Tibetan consonant

Used for transcribing other languages.

Can be written using U+0F4C TIBETAN LETTER DDA and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

The shape is a reversed version of U+0F52 TIBETAN LETTER DHA .

Subjoined form is U+0F9D TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DDHA  ྜྷ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F4E TIBETAN LETTER NNA

Tibetan consonant

Used for transcribing other languages, and also to distinguish foreign loan words from sequences of Tibetan syllables, eg. ཁ་ཎ་ཌ་ kha-ṇa-ḍa (Canada).

The shape is a reversed version of U+0F53 TIBETAN LETTER NA .

Subjoined form is U+0F9E TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER NNA  ྞ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F4F TIBETAN LETTER TA

Tibetan consonant

Used with subscript ཏྲ tra.

Subjoined form is U+0F9F TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TA  ྟ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F50 TIBETAN LETTER THA

Tibetan consonant

tʰá

Used with subscript ཐྲ tʰra.

Subjoined form is U+0FA0 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER THA  ྠ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436,

U+0F51 TIBETAN LETTER DA

Tibetan consonant

, tʰá

Used as a prefix with 6 consonants, eg. དགའ་ dga (virtue).

Modifies the root vowel when used as a suffix, eg. བསད་ bsad sɛ́ (killed).

Until the 19th century, was used as a silent secondary suffix, but not officially in modern Tibetan, eg. གྱུརད་ gyurd kjùr (became).

Used with subscripts, དྲ dra, དྭ da.

Subjoined form is U+0FA1 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DA  ྡ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F52 TIBETAN LETTER DHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F51 0FB7

Tibetan consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0F51 TIBETAN LETTER DA and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Subjoined form is U+0FA2 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DHA  ྡྷ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F53 TIBETAN LETTER NA

Tibetan consonant

n when used as a suffix, but it also modifies the root vowel, eg. བདུན་ bdun dỳn (seven).

Used with subscript ནྲ na.

Subjoined form is U+0FA3 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER NA  ྣ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F54 TIBETAN LETTER PA

Tibetan consonant

Used with subscripts, པྱ cja, པྲ tra, eg. སྤྱིར་ spyir ʧí (general).

Subjoined form is U+0FA4 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER PA  ྤ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F55 TIBETAN LETTER PHA

Tibetan consonant

pʰá

Used with subscripts, ཕྱ cʰja, ཕྲ tʰra.

Subjoined form is U+0FA5 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER PHA  ྥ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F56 TIBETAN LETTER BA

Tibetan consonant

, pʰà

Used as a prefix before 10 consonants.

b when used as a suffix, eg. བསྒྲུབས་ bsgrubs ɖɹúb (established).

Used with subscripts, བྱ ʤja, བྲ tra, བླ la.

Subjoined form is U+0FA6 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER BA  ྦ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F57 TIBETAN LETTER BHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F56 0FB7

Tibetan consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0F56 TIBETAN LETTER BA and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Subjoined form is U+0FA7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER BHA  ྦྷ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F58 TIBETAN LETTER MA

Tibetan consonant

Used as a prefix before 11 consonants.

m when used as a suffix, eg. འགྲེམས་སྟོན་ 'grems-ston ɖɹem-ton (exhibition).

Used with subscripts, མྱ ɲa, མྲ ma.

Subjoined form is U+0FA8 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER MA  ྨ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F59 TIBETAN LETTER TSA

Tibetan consonant

tsá

Used with subscript ཙྭ tsa.

Subjoined form is U+0FA9 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TSA  ྩ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F5A TIBETAN LETTER TSHA

Tibetan consonant

tsʰá

Used with subscript ཚྭ ʧa.

Subjoined form is U+0FAA TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TSHA  ྪ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F5B TIBETAN LETTER DZA

Tibetan consonant

tsà

Subjoined form is U+0FAB TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DZA  ྫ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F5C TIBETAN LETTER DZHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F5B 0FB7

Tibetan consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0F5B TIBETAN LETTER DZA and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Subjoined form is U+0FAC TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DZHA  ྫྷ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F5D TIBETAN LETTER WA

U+0F5E TIBETAN LETTER ZHA

Tibetan consonant

ʃà

Used with subscript ཞྭ zʰa.

Subjoined form is U+0FAE TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER ZHA  ྮ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F5F TIBETAN LETTER ZA

Tibetan consonant

Used with subscripts, ཟླ da, ཟྭ za.

Subjoined form is U+0FAF TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER ZA  ྯ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F60 TIBETAN LETTER -A

Tibetan consonant, 'a-chung

à

Used as a prefix before 10 consonants, eg. འཁོར་ལོ་ 'khor-lo kor-lo (wheel).

a when used as a suffix.

May also nasalise the juncture of two morphemes, as in དགེ་འདུན་ dge-'dun (buddhist community), pronounced ɡenyn.

Can be used as a base for dependent vowel signs, in which case the a sound is replaced by that of the vowel. It has a low tone (cf. U+0F68 TIBETAN LETTER A ).

Other than loanwords, Tibetan only allows diphthongs in diminutive expressions. 'A-chung is used to write these, as in the following: མི་ mi person > མེའུ་ me'u dwarf; རྡོ་ rdo stone > རྡེའུ་ rde'u pebble.

Can be used to disambiguate the location of an inherent vowel in a syllable. The sequence དག་ dag dàg (I) is interpreted as CVC. To express CCV add 'a-chung, eg. དགའ་ dga (virtue).

Subjoined form is U+0FB0 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER -A  ྰ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F61 TIBETAN LETTER YA

Tibetan consonant

Subjoined form is U+0FB1 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER YA  ྱ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F62 TIBETAN LETTER RA

Description in the Unicode standard:

• when followed by a subjoined letter = ra mgo

Tibetan consonant

, eg. རེ་བ་ re-ba re-wa (hope).

r when used as a suffix, eg. འཁོར་ལོ་ 'khor-lo kor-lo (wheel).

Used as a superscript with 13 consonants, རྐ ka རྒ ga རྔ ŋa རྗ ʤa རྙ ɲa རྟ ta རྡ da རྣ na རྦ ba རྨ ma རྩ tsa རྫ dza རླ la རྭ ra.

The shape at the top of a stack can vary, depending on the subjoined consonant that follows. Usually it has a reduced form, eg. རྐ rka, but other times it retains its full form, eg. རྙ rnya. Use the standard character always: the font will choose the appropriate glyph for the context

Subjoined form is U+0FB2 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER RA  ྲ.

See also U+0F6A TIBETAN LETTER FIXED-FORM RA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F63 TIBETAN LETTER LA

Tibetan consonant

l when used as a suffix, but also modifies the root vowel value.

Used as a superscript with 11 consonants, ལྐ ka ལྒ ga ལྔ ŋa ལྕ ca ལྗ ʤa ལྟ ta ལྡ da ལྤ pa ལྦ ba ལྷ lha ལྭ la .

Subjoined form is U+0FB3 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER LA  ླ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F64 TIBETAN LETTER SHA

Tibetan consonant

ʃá

Used with subscript ཤྭ ʃa.

Subjoined form is U+0FB4 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER SHA  ྴ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F65 TIBETAN LETTER SSA

Description in the Unicode standard:

= reversed sha

Tibetan consonant

Used for transcribing other languages, and also to distinguish foreign loan words from sequences of Tibetan syllables.

The shape is a reversed version of U+0F64 TIBETAN LETTER SHA .

Subjoined form is U+0FB5 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER SSA  ྵ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F66 TIBETAN LETTER SA

Tibetan consonant

Used as a prefix with 11 consonants.

When used as a suffix modifies the root vowel's value.

Only two characters can appear in the secondary suffix location, according to Tibetan grammar, and is one. A character in this position adds no sound, nor does it affect the sounds in the rest of the syllable, eg. བསྒྲུབས་ bsgrubs ɖɹúb (established). 

Used as superscript with 13 consonants, སྐ ka སྒ ga སྔ ŋa སྙ ɲa སྟ ta སྡ da སྡ na སྤ pa སྦ ba སྨ ma སྩ tsa སྲ sa སླ la.

Subjoined form is U+0FB6 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER SA  ྶ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F67 TIBETAN LETTER HA

Tibetan consonant

Used with subscripts, ཧྱ hja, ཧྲ hra, ཧྭ ha.

Subjoined form is U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F68 TIBETAN LETTER A

Description in the Unicode standard:

• base for dependent vowels

Tibetan consonant

á

Used as a base for dependent vowels, with a high tone (cf. U+0F60 TIBETAN LETTER -A ).

Subjoined form is U+0FB8 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER A  ྸ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F69 TIBETAN LETTER KSSA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F40 0FB5

Tibetan consonant

Used for transcription/transliteration of foreign text.

Should be written using U+0F40 TIBETAN LETTER KA and U+0FB5 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER SSA  ྵ .

Subjoined form is U+0FB9 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER KSSA  ྐྵ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F6A TIBETAN LETTER FIXED-FORM RA

Description in the Unicode standard:

• fixed-form letter not showing the shape variation of the ordinary ra
• used only in transliteration and transcription
→ (tibetan letter ra - 0F62)

Tibetan fixed form variant of consonant

Used only in transliteration of non-Tibetan texts, not in normal Tibetan text.

U+0F62 TIBETAN LETTER RA at the top of a stack usually has a reduced form, eg. རྐ rka. For transliterations it is sometimes desirable to retain the full form of RA where in Tibetan words it would be reduced. To do this use this character instead of the normal RA, but only where the normal RA would not produce the full form anyway, ie. do not use eg. རྙ rnya, which has the full form already.

Standard form is U+0F62 TIBETAN LETTER RA .

See also U+0FBC TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER FIXED-FORM RA  ྼ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p329

Subjoined consonants

U+0F90 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER KA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used with superscripts, རྐ ka, ལྐ ka, སྐ ka, eg. སྐར་ཆ་ skar-cha karcʰe (second).

Head form is U+0F40 TIBETAN LETTER KA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F91 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER KHA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Head form is U+0F41 TIBETAN LETTER KHA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F92 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER GA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used with superscripts, རྒ ga, ལྒ ga, སྒ ga.

Head form is U+0F42 TIBETAN LETTER GA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F93 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER GHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F92 0FB7

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0F92 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER GA  ྒ and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Head form is U+0F43 TIBETAN LETTER GHA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p328, Daniels, p431-436

U+0F94 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER NGA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used with superscripts, རྔ ŋa, ལྔ ŋa, སྔ ŋa.

Head form is U+0F44 TIBETAN LETTER NGA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F95 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER CA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

ʧá

Used with superscript ལྕ ʧa.

Head form is U+0F45 TIBETAN LETTER CA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F96 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER CHA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

ʧʰá

Head form is U+0F46 TIBETAN LETTER CHA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F97 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER JA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

ʧà

Used with superscript རྗ ʤa.

Head form is U+0F47 TIBETAN LETTER JA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F99 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER NYA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

ɲà

Used with superscript རྙ ɲa . This cluster is unusual in that U+0F62 TIBETAN LETTER RA above it keeps its full form.

Head form is U+0F49 TIBETAN LETTER NYA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F9A TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TTA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used for transcribing other languages.

Head form is U+0F4A TIBETAN LETTER TTA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F9B TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TTHA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used for transcribing other languages.

Head form is U+0F4B TIBETAN LETTER TTHA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F9C TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DDA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used for transcribing other languages.

Head form is U+0F4C TIBETAN LETTER DDA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F9D TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DDHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F9C 0FB7

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0F9C TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DDA  ྜ and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Head form is U+0F4D TIBETAN LETTER DDHA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p328, Daniels, p431-436

U+0F9E TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER NNA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used for transcribing other languages.

Head form is U+0F4E TIBETAN LETTER NNA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0F9F TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used with superscripts, རྟ ta, ལྟ ta, སྟ ta.

Head form is U+0F4F TIBETAN LETTER TA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FA0 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER THA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

tʰá

Head form is U+0F50 TIBETAN LETTER THA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436,

U+0FA1 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

, tʰá

Used with superscripts, རྡ da, ལྡ da, སྡ da.

Head form is U+0F51 TIBETAN LETTER DA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FA2 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0FA1 0FB7

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0FA2 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DHA  ྡྷ and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Head form is U+0F52 TIBETAN LETTER DHA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0FA3 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER NA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used with superscript རྣ na.

Head form is U+0F53 TIBETAN LETTER NA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FA4 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER PA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used with superscripts, ལྤ pa, སྤ pa.

Head form is U+0F54 TIBETAN LETTER PA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FA5 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER PHA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

pʰá

Head form is U+0F55 TIBETAN LETTER PHA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FA6 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER BA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

, pʰà

Used with superscripts, རྦ ba, ལྦ ba, སྦ ba.

Head form is U+0F56 TIBETAN LETTER BA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FA7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER BHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0FA6 0FB7

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0FA6 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER BA  ྦ and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Head form is U+0F57 TIBETAN LETTER BHA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0FA8 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER MA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used with superscripts, རྨ ma, སྨ ma.

Head form is U+0F58 TIBETAN LETTER MA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FA9 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TSA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

tsá

Used with superscripts, རྩ tsa, སྩ tsa.

Head form is U+0F59 TIBETAN LETTER TSA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FAA TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER TSHA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

tsʰá

Head form is U+0F5A TIBETAN LETTER TSHA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FAB TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DZA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

tsà

Used with superscript རྫ dza.

Head form is U+0F5B TIBETAN LETTER DZA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FAC TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DZHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0FAB 0FB7

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used to represent an aspirated consonant in transcription/transliteration of non-Tibetan words.

Can be written using U+0FAB TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER DZA  ྫ and U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA  ྷ . The Unicode Standard recommends using this precomposed form, but many applications silently normalise this to two characters.

Head form is U+0F5C TIBETAN LETTER DZHA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0FAD TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER WA

Description in the Unicode standard:

= wa-zur, wa-btags (wa ta)

Tibetan subjoined consonant, wazur wa-zur, sometimes called wa-ta wa-btags

Used as a subscript with 13 consonants: ཀྭ ka ཁྭ ka གྭ ga ཉྭ ɲa དྭ da ཙྭ tsa ཚྭ ʧa ཞྭ zʰa ཟྭ za རྭ ra ལྭ la ཤྭ ʃa ཧྭ ha .

Uniquely, WA can also appear as a sub-subscript, as in གྲྭ་ grwa.

Head form is U+0F5D TIBETAN LETTER WA .

See also U+0FBA TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER FIXED-FORM WA  ྺ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FAE TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER ZHA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

ʃà

Head form is U+0F5E TIBETAN LETTER ZHA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FAF TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER ZA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Head form is U+0F5F TIBETAN LETTER ZA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FB0 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER -A

Description in the Unicode standard:

= a-chung
• rare, only used for full-sized subjoined letter
→ (tibetan vowel sign aa - 0F71)

Tibetan subjoined consonant

à

A subjoined 'a-chung is used to express long vowels in loan words (Tibetan doesn't have them natively), such as those borrowed from Chinese, Hindi and Mongolian. For example, ཏཱ་བླ་མ་ tā-bla-ma (grand lama) (ta from Chinese), and ཤྲཱི་ shrī (wealth) from Sanskrit. For this purpose you should use U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA  ཱ, and not U+0FB0 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER -A  ྰ.

The Unicode Standard says of SUBJOINED LETTER -A: "U+0FB0 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER -A ( a-chung ) should be used only in the very rare cases where a full-sized subjoined a-chung letter is required. The small vowel lengthening a-chung encoded as U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA is far more frequently used in Tibetan text, and it is therefore recommended that implementations treat this character (rather than U+0FB0) as the normal subjoined a-chung".

Head form is U+0F60 TIBETAN LETTER -A .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0FB1 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER YA

Description in the Unicode standard:

= ya-btags (ya ta)

Tibetan subjoined consonant, ya-ta ya-btags

Used as a subscript with 14 consonants, ཀྱ kja ཁྱ kʰja གྱ gja པྱ cja ཕྱ cʰja བྱ ʤja མྱ ɲa ཧྱ hja ཀྲ tra ཁྲ tʰra གྲ dra ཏྲ tra ཐྲ tʰra དྲ dra ནྲ na .

Head form is U+0F61 TIBETAN LETTER YA .

See also U+0FBB TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER FIXED-FORM YA  ྻ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FB2 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER RA

Description in the Unicode standard:

= ra-btags (ra ta)

Tibetan subjoined consonant, ra-ta ra-btags

Used as a subscript with 13 consonants, ཀྲ tra ཁྲ tʰra གྲ dra ཏྲ tra ཐྲ tʰra དྲ dra ནྲ na པྲ tra ཕྲ tʰra བྲ tra མྲ ma སྲ sa ཧྲ hra.

Head form is U+0F62 TIBETAN LETTER RA .

See also U+0FBC TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER FIXED-FORM RA  ྼ.

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FB3 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER LA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used as a subscript with 6 consonants, ཀླ la གླ la བླ la རླ la སླ la ཟླ da .

Head form is U+0F63 TIBETAN LETTER LA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FB4 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER SHA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

ʃá

Head form is U+0F64 TIBETAN LETTER SHA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FB5 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER SSA

Description in the Unicode standard:

= reversed subjoined sha

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used for transcribing other languages.

Head form is U+0F65 TIBETAN LETTER SSA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FB6 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER SA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Head form is U+0F66 TIBETAN LETTER SA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FB7 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER HA

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used with superscript ལྷ lha.

Head form is U+0F67 TIBETAN LETTER HA .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Tibetan Language Student

U+0FB8 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER A

Tibetan subjoined consonant

á

Head form is U+0F68 TIBETAN LETTER A .

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0FB9 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER KSSA

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0F90 0FB5

Tibetan subjoined consonant

Used for transcription/transliteration of foreign text.

Should be written using U+0F90 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER KA  ྐ and U+0FB5 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER SSA  ྵ .

Head form is U+0F69 TIBETAN LETTER KSSA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

Extensions for Balti

U+0F6B TIBETAN LETTER KKA

U+0F6C TIBETAN LETTER RRA

Dependent vowel signs

U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA

Description in the Unicode standard:

= a-chung
• common, vowel-lengthening mark

Tibetan vowel lengthening mark

à

A subjoined 'a-chung is used to express long vowels in loan words (Tibetan doesn't have them natively), such as those borrowed from Chinese, Hindi and Mongolian. For example, ཏཱ་བླ་མ་ tā-bla-ma (grand lama) (ta from Chinese), and ཤྲཱི་ śrī (wealth) from Sanskrit. For this purpose you should use U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA  ཱ, and not U+0FB0 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER -A  ྰ.

The Unicode Standard says of SUBJOINED LETTER -A: "U+0FB0 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER -A ( a-chung ) should be used only in the very rare cases where a full-sized subjoined a-chung letter is required. The small vowel lengthening a-chung encoded as U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA is far more frequently used in Tibetan text, and it is therefore recommended that implementations treat this character (rather than U+0FB0) as the normal subjoined a-chung".

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436, The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F72 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN I

Tibetan vowel sign

i

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F73 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN II

Description in the Unicode standard:

• use of this character is discouraged
≡ 0F71 0F72

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions. Do not use. Use instead U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA  ཱ, U+0F72 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN I  ི.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F74 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN U

Tibetan vowel sign

u

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F75 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN UU

Description in the Unicode standard:

• use of this character is discouraged
≡ 0F71 0F74

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions. Do not use. Use instead U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA  ཱ, U+0F74 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN U  ུ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F76 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN VOCALIC R

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0FB2 0F80

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions. Use instead U+0FB2 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER RA  ྲ, U+0F80 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN REVERSED I  ྀ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F77 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN VOCALIC RR

Description in the Unicode standard:

• this character is deprecated and its use is strongly discouraged
≈ 0FB2 0F81

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions. Do not use! Use instead U+0FB2 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER RA  ྲ, U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA  ཱ, U+0F80 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN REVERSED I  ྀ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F78 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN VOCALIC L

Description in the Unicode standard:

≡ 0FB3 0F80

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions. Use instead U+0FB3 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER LA  ླ, U+0F80 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN REVERSED I  ྀ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F79 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN VOCALIC LL

Description in the Unicode standard:

• this character is deprecated and its use is strongly discouraged
≈ 0FB3 0F81

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions. Do not use! Use instead U+0FB3 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER LA  ླ, U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA  ཱ, U+0F80 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN REVERSED I  ྀ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F7A TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN E

Tibetan vowel sign

e

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F7B TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN EE

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F7C TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN O

Tibetan vowel sign

o

Notes. Refs: Daniels, p431-436

U+0F7D TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN OO

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F80 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN REVERSED I

Tibetan vowel sign

Used for Sanskrit transcriptions.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

U+0F81 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN REVERSED II

Description in the Unicode standard:

• use of this character is discouraged
≡ 0F71 0F80

Tibetan vowel sign

Combination used for Sanskrit transcriptions. Do not use. Use instead U+0F71 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN AA  ཱ, U+0F80 TIBETAN VOWEL SIGN REVERSED I  ྀ.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

Vocalic modification

U+0F7E TIBETAN SIGN RJES SU NGA RO

Description in the Unicode standard:

= anusvara

Tibetan anusvara ngaro

Used for Sanskrit transcriptions to represent the anusvara.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

ཿ

U+0F7F TIBETAN SIGN RNAM BCAD

Description in the Unicode standard:

= visarga

Tibetan anusvara nam-chay

Used for Sanskrit transcriptions to represent the visarga.

May be followed by space characters.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344

Transliteration head letters

U+0F88 TIBETAN SIGN LCE TSA CAN

Description in the Unicode standard:

→ (vedic sign jihvamuliya - 1CF5)
→ (mongolian letter ali gali damaru - 1882)

Tibetan sign

Used in Tibetan books on Sanskrit grammar, in ritual texts focused on the Kalacakra ("Wheel of time") system, and in commentaries on the Kalacakra Tantra.

Used as a superfix to the letters KA and KHA.

Subjoined form is U+0F8D TIBETAN SUBJOINED SIGN LCE TSA CAN  ྍ.

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode four Tibetan-Sanskrit letters used in Kalacakra texts

U+0F89 TIBETAN SIGN MCHU CAN

Description in the Unicode standard:

→ (vedic sign upadhmaniya - 1CF6)
→ (mongolian letter ali gali inverted ubadama - 1884)

Tibetan sign

Used in Tibetan books on Sanskrit grammar, in ritual texts focused on the Kalacakra ("Wheel of time") system, and in commentaries on the Kalacakra Tantra.

Used as a superfix to the letters PA and PHA.

Subjoined form is U+0F8E TIBETAN SUBJOINED SIGN MCHU CAN  ྎ.

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode four Tibetan-Sanskrit letters used in Kalacakra texts

U+0F8A TIBETAN SIGN GRU CAN RGYINGS

Description in the Unicode standard:

• always followed by 0F82

U+0F8B TIBETAN SIGN GRU MED RGYINGS

U+0F8C TIBETAN SIGN INVERTED MCHU CAN

Description in the Unicode standard:

→ (mongolian letter ali gali ubadama - 1883)

Transliteration subjoined signs

U+0F8D TIBETAN SUBJOINED SIGN LCE TSA CAN

Tibetan subjoined sign

Very rare. Used in Tibetan books on Sanskrit grammar, in ritual texts focused on the Kalacakra ("Wheel of time") system, and in commentaries on the Kalacakra Tantra.

Head form is U+0F88 TIBETAN SIGN LCE TSA CAN .

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode four Tibetan-Sanskrit letters used in Kalacakra texts

U+0F89 TIBETAN SUBJOINED SIGN MCHU CAN

Tibetan subjoined sign

Very rare. Used in Tibetan books on Sanskrit grammar, in ritual texts focused on the Kalacakra ("Wheel of time") system, and in commentaries on the Kalacakra Tantra.

Head form is U+0F89 TIBETAN SIGN MCHU CAN .

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode four Tibetan-Sanskrit letters used in Kalacakra texts

U+0F8F TIBETAN SUBJOINED SIGN INVERTED MCHU CAN

Tibetan subjoined sign

Rare. Used in Tibetan books on Sanskrit grammar. See also U+0F8E TIBETAN SUBJOINED SIGN MCHU CAN  ྎ. The ordinary and inverted forms of this sign are used contrastively in an important 18th century Chinese text, Tóngwén Yùntǒng , which describes the rules for transliterating Sanskrit and Tibetan into Mongolian and Manchu.

Head form is U+0F8C TIBETAN SIGN INVERTED MCHU CAN .

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode four Tibetan-Sanskrit letters used in Kalacakra texts

Fixed-form subjoined consonants

U+0FBA TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER FIXED-FORM WA

Tibetan fixed form variant of subjoined consonant

Used in transliteration of non-Tibetan texts, not in normal Tibetan text.

Head form is U+0F5D TIBETAN LETTER WA .

See also U+0FAD TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER WA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p329

U+0FBB TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER FIXED-FORM YA

Tibetan fixed form variant of subjoined consonant

Used in transliteration of non-Tibetan texts, not in normal Tibetan text.

Head form is U+0F61 TIBETAN LETTER YA .

See also U+0FB1 TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER YA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p329

U+0FBC TIBETAN SUBJOINED LETTER FIXED-FORM RA

Tibetan fixed form variant of subjoined consonant

Used in transliteration of non-Tibetan texts, not in normal Tibetan text.

Head form is U+0F62 TIBETAN LETTER RA .

See also U+0F6A TIBETAN LETTER FIXED-FORM RA .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p329

Head marks

U+0F01 TIBETAN MARK GTER YIG MGO TRUNCATED A

U+0F02 TIBETAN MARK GTER YIG MGO -UM RNAM BCAD MA

U+0F03 TIBETAN MARK GTER YIG MGO -UM GTER TSHEG MA

U+0F04 TIBETAN MARK INITIAL YIG MGO MDUN MA

Description in the Unicode standard:

• honorific; marks beginning of text or start of new folio
→ (mongolian birga - 1800)

U+0F05 TIBETAN MARK CLOSING YIG MGO SGAB MA

Description in the Unicode standard:

• follows and ligates with initial yig-mgo

U+0F06 TIBETAN MARK CARET YIG MGO PHUR SHAD MA

U+0F07 TIBETAN MARK YIG MGO TSHEG SHAD MA

U+0FD3 TIBETAN MARK INITIAL BRDA RNYING YIG MGO MDUN MA

Tibetan head mark, da nying yik go dun ma

Stylistic variant of U+0F04 TIBETAN MARK INITIAL YIG MGO MDUN MA , used for archaic documents.

Head marks appear at the start of the front folio of loose-leaved pechas, to indicate where to begin reading. See Tibetan script notes. See also the Unicode proposal for more information and examples.

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode two archaic Tibetan punctuation marks

U+0FD4 TIBETAN MARK CLOSING BRDA RNYING YIG MGO SGAB MA

Tibetan head mark extension, da nying yik go dun ma

Stylistic variant of U+0F05 TIBETAN MARK CLOSING YIG MGO SGAB MA , used for archaic documents.

Head marks appear at the start of the front folio of loose-leaved pechas, to indicate where to begin reading. The head mark may be followed by one or more of these extension marks. See Tibetan script notes. See also the Unicode proposal for more information and examples.

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode two archaic Tibetan punctuation marks

Paired punctuation

U+0F3A TIBETAN MARK GUG RTAGS GYON

Tibetan punctuation

Bracket, paired with U+0F3B TIBETAN MARK GUG RTAGS GYAS .

U+0F3B TIBETAN MARK GUG RTAGS GYAS

Description in the Unicode standard:

• brackets

Tibetan punctuation

Bracket, paired with U+0F3A TIBETAN MARK GUG RTAGS GYON .

U+0F3C TIBETAN MARK ANG KHANG GYON

Tibetan punctuation

Paired with U+0F3D TIBETAN MARK ANG KHANG GYAS to form a roof over one or more digits or words.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, Formatting rules for Tibetan text

U+0F3D TIBETAN MARK ANG KHANG GYAS

Description in the Unicode standard:

• used for bracketing with a roof over

Tibetan punctuation

Paired with U+0F3C TIBETAN MARK ANG KHANG GYON to form a roof over one or more digits or words.

Can also be used alone much like a single parenthesis in list counters.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, Formatting rules for Tibetan text

Marks and signs

U+0F08 TIBETAN MARK SBRUL SHAD

Description in the Unicode standard:

• separates sections of meaning equivalent to topics and sub-topics

Tibetan punctuation

Used to separate texts that are equivalent to topics and subtopics, such as the start of a smaller text, the start of a prayer, a chapter boundary, or to mark the beginning and end of insertions into text in pechas. This drul-shay is usually surrounded on both sides by the equivalent of about three non-breaking spaces (though no rule is specified). The drul-shay should not appear at the beginning of a new line and the whole structure of spacing-plus-shay needs to be kept together

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, Formatting rules for Tibetan text

U+0F09 TIBETAN MARK BSKUR YIG MGO

Description in the Unicode standard:

• list enumerator, used in Bhutan

Dzongka sign

List enumerator, used at the beginning of administrative letters in Bhutan.

U+0F0A TIBETAN MARK BKA- SHOG YIG MGO

Description in the Unicode standard:

• petition honorific, used in Bhutan

Dzongka sign

Petition honorific, used at the beginning of administrative letters in Bhutan.

U+0F0B TIBETAN MARK INTERSYLLABIC TSHEG

Description in the Unicode standard:

= tsek
• morpheme delimiter (approximate meaning)
• the normal tsheg; provides a break opportunity
• character name is a misnomer

Tibetan primary break delimiter, tsek tsheg

Performs the role of spaces in English for line breaking. eg. དོནཚནདངཔོ། འགྲོམིའིརིགསརྒྱུདཡོངསསྐྱེསཙམཉིདནསཆེམཐོངསདང༌། ཐོབཐངགིརངདབངའདྲམཉམདུཡོདལ། ཁོངཚོརརངབྱུངགིབློརྩལདངབསམཚུལབཟངཔོའདོནཔའིའོསབབསཀྱངཡོད། དེབཞིནཕནཚུནགཅིགགིསགཅིགབུསྤུནགྱིའདུཤེསའཛིནཔའིབྱསྤྱོདཀྱངལགལེནབསྟརདགོསཡིན༎.

Often referred to as a 'syllable' delimiter, but not a syllable as in English.

See also U+0F0C TIBETAN MARK DELIMITER TSHEG BSTAR .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p330

U+0F0C TIBETAN MARK DELIMITER TSHEG BSTAR

Description in the Unicode standard:

• a non-breaking tsheg; inhibits line breaking
• character name is a misnomer
≈ [noBreak] 0F0B

U+0F0D TIBETAN MARK SHAD

Description in the Unicode standard:

= shey
• marks end of a section of text (tshig-grub)
→ (devanagari danda - 0964)

Tibetan section end marker, shay shad

Denotes the end of a piece of text called a tshig-grub, a unit that can't be compared with English phrases or sentences, eg. དོན་ཚན་དང་པོ འགྲོ་བ་མིའི་རིགས་རྒྱུད་ཡོངས་ལ་སྐྱེས་ཙམ་ཉིད་ནས་ཆེ་མཐོངས་དང༌ ཐོབ་ཐངགི་རང་དབང་འདྲ་མཉམ་དུ་ཡོད་ལ ཁོང་ཚོར་རང་བྱུང་གི་བློ་རྩལ་དང་བསམ་ཚུལ་བཟང་པོ་འདོན་པའི་འོས་བབས་ཀྱང་ཡོད དེ་བཞིན་ཕན་ཚུན་གཅིག་གིས་གཅིག་ལ་བུ་སྤུན་གྱི་འདུ་ཤེས་འཛིན་པའི་བྱ་སྤྱོད་ཀྱང་ལག་ལེན་བསྟར་དགོས་པ་ཡིན༎

See also U+0F0E TIBETAN MARK NYIS SHAD .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p328

U+0F0E TIBETAN MARK NYIS SHAD

Description in the Unicode standard:

• marks end of a whole topic (don-tshan)
→ (devanagari double danda - 0965)

Tibetan topic end marker, shay shad

Denotes the end of a piece of text called a don-tshan, a unit that can't be compared with English phrases or sentences, eg. དོན་ཚན་དང་པོ། འགྲོ་བ་མིའི་རིགས་རྒྱུད་ཡོངས་ལ་སྐྱེས་ཙམ་ཉིད་ནས་ཆེ་མཐོངས་དང༌། ཐོབ་ཐངགི་རང་དབང་འདྲ་མཉམ་དུ་ཡོད་ལ། ཁོང་ཚོར་རང་བྱུང་གི་བློ་རྩལ་དང་བསམ་ཚུལ་བཟང་པོ་འདོན་པའི་འོས་བབས་ཀྱང་ཡོད། དེ་བཞིན་ཕན་ཚུན་གཅིག་གིས་གཅིག་ལ་བུ་སྤུན་གྱི་འདུ་ཤེས་འཛིན་པའི་བྱ་སྤྱོད་ཀྱང་ལག་ལེན་བསྟར་དགོས་པ་ཡིན

Content authors may also just use two single shays together, if the spacing looks right.

See also U+0F0D TIBETAN MARK SHAD .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p328

U+0F0F TIBETAN MARK TSHEG SHAD

U+0F10 TIBETAN MARK NYIS TSHEG SHAD

U+0F11 TIBETAN MARK RIN CHEN SPUNGS SHAD

Description in the Unicode standard:

• shad which follows a tsheg-bar that starts a new line

U+0F12 TIBETAN MARK RGYA GRAM SHAD

U+0F13 TIBETAN MARK CARET -DZUD RTAGS ME LONG CAN

U+0F14 TIBETAN MARK GTER TSHEG

Description in the Unicode standard:

• used as a comma-like text delimiter
→ (khmer sign camnuc pii kuuh - 17D6)

Tibetan sign, ter tsek

If a section of text is actually a gter ma, a single terma symbol replaces both shad and double shad ། །. Wood-block pechas sometimes simplify the gter ma, so that it looks like a visarga ཿ.

Notes. Refs: Formatting rules for Tibetan text

U+0F34 TIBETAN MARK BSDUS RTAGS

Description in the Unicode standard:

• repetition

Tibetan repetition sign, bsdus-rtags du tag བསྡུས་རྟགས

Indicates that text should continue as before, similar to 'etc.', and is used after the first few tsek-bar of a recurring phrase.

Notes. Refs: Formatting rules for Tibetan text

U+0F35 TIBETAN MARK NGAS BZUNG NYI ZLA

Description in the Unicode standard:

• honorific, emphasis; used like underlining

Tibetan emphasis sign

Used to create a similar effect to underlining or to mark emphasis. The use of this mark is not straightforward, since it attaches to a syllable rather than a character and therefore to place it correctly the application needs to take syllable boundary positions into account. If entered as a combining character it can be added after the vowel-sign in a stack. Example: སྐལ་ལྡན་གདུལ་བྱར་སྣང་བའི་བསོ༵ད་ནམ༵ས་གཟུགས།

May also be used in interspersed commentaries to tag the root text that is being commented on. Example: སྐུ༵་གསུ༵ང་ཐུག༵ས།

Application software has to ignore this character for text processing, such as search and collation.

See also U+0F37 TIBETAN MARK NGAS BZUNG SGOR RTAGS ◌༷.

Notes. Refs: Formatting rules for Tibetan text

U+0F36 TIBETAN MARK CARET -DZUD RTAGS BZHI MIG CAN

Description in the Unicode standard:

• marks point of text insertion or annotation

Tibetan

Used with U+0FBF TIBETAN KU RU KHA BZHI MIG CAN ྿ to indicate where text should be inserted within other text or as references to footnotes and marginal notes. Marks the point of text insertion or annotation.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p330

U+0F37 TIBETAN MARK NGAS BZUNG SGOR RTAGS

Description in the Unicode standard:

• emphasis; used like underlining

Tibetan emphasis sign

Used to create a similar effect to underlining or to mark emphasis. The use of this mark is not straightforward, since it attaches to a syllable rather than a character and therefore to place it correctly the application needs to take syllable boundary positions into account. If entered as a combining character it can be added after the vowel-sign in a stack. Example: སྐལ་ལྡན་གདུལ་བྱར་སྣང་བའི་བསོ༷ད་ནམ༷ས་གཟུགས།

May also be used in interspersed commentaries to tag the root text that is being commented on. Example: སྐུ༷་གསུ༷ང་ཐུག༷ས།

Application software has to ignore this character for text processing, such as search and collation.

See also U+0F35 TIBETAN MARK NGAS BZUNG NYI ZLA ◌༵.

Notes. Refs: Formatting rules for Tibetan text

U+0F38 TIBETAN MARK CHE MGO

U+0F39 TIBETAN MARK TSA -PHRU

Description in the Unicode standard:

• a lenition mark

Tibetan lenition mark, tsa-'phru

Should be used immediately after the consonant it modifies, even if that consonant is followed by a subjoined consonant.

This is an integral part of the three consonants U+0F59 TIBETAN LETTER TSA , U+0F5A TIBETAN LETTER TSHA , and U+0F5B TIBETAN LETTER DZA . Although those consonants are not decomposable, this mark has been abstracted and may by itself be applied to U+0F55 TIBETAN LETTER PHA (ie. ཕ༹) and other consonants to make new letters for use in transliteration and transcription of other languages. For example, in modern literary Tibetan, it is one of the ways used to transcribe the Chinese “fa” and “va” sounds not represented by the normal Tibetan consonants.

Also used to represent tsa , tsha , and dza in abbreviations.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p328,333

U+0F82 TIBETAN SIGN NYI ZLA NAA DA

U+0F83 TIBETAN SIGN SNA LDAN

Description in the Unicode standard:

→ (devanagari sign candrabindu - 0901)

U+0F84 TIBETAN MARK HALANTA

Description in the Unicode standard:

= srog med
→ (devanagari sign virama - 094D)

Tibetan virama, srog med

Not used for Tibetan text.

Used in transliteration of Devanagari to kill the inherent vowel sound of a preceding character, eg. ཛཔ྄ is pronounced ʤap and not ʤapa.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p330

U+0F85 TIBETAN MARK PALUTA

Description in the Unicode standard:

• transliteration of Sanskrit avagraha
→ (devanagari sign avagraha - 093D)

U+0F86 TIBETAN SIGN LCI RTAGS

U+0F87 TIBETAN SIGN YANG RTAGS

U+0FBE TIBETAN KU RU KHA

Description in the Unicode standard:

• often repeated three times; indicates a refrain

Tibetan

Indicates a refrain. Often repeated three times.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p330

྿

U+0FBF TIBETAN KU RU KHA BZHI MIG CAN

Description in the Unicode standard:

• marks point of text insertion or annotation
→ (reference mark - 203B)

Tibetan

Used with U+0F36 TIBETAN MARK CARET -DZUD RTAGS BZHI MIG CAN to indicate where text should be inserted within other text or as references to footnotes and marginal notes. Marks the point of text insertion or annotation.

Similar to U+203B REFERENCE MARK .

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p330

U+0FD0 TIBETAN MARK BSKA- SHOG GI MGO RGYAN

Description in the Unicode standard:

% TIBETAN MARK BKA- SHOG GI MGO RGYAN
• used in Bhutan

U+0FD1 TIBETAN MARK MNYAM YIG GI MGO RGYAN

Description in the Unicode standard:

• used in Bhutan

U+0FD2 TIBETAN MARK NYIS TSHEG

Description in the Unicode standard:

= nyi tsek

Tibetan tsek

Variant of U+0F0B TIBETAN MARK INTERSYLLABIC TSHEG , common in early Tibetan monumental inscriptions and manuscript texts. Sometimes used alongside the normal tsek.

It may also be used between shays to mark off the end of a topic, eg. །࿒།࿒།.

In some modern texts it has been used to point to the start of a section to which a textual note applies.

See Tibetan script notes for more information about use of the tsek. See also the Unicode proposal for more information and examples.

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode two archaic Tibetan punctuation marks

Astrological signs

U+0F15 TIBETAN LOGOTYPE SIGN CHAD RTAGS

U+0F16 TIBETAN LOGOTYPE SIGN LHAG RTAGS

U+0F17 TIBETAN ASTROLOGICAL SIGN SGRA GCAN -CHAR RTAGS

U+0F18 TIBETAN ASTROLOGICAL SIGN -KHYUD PA

Description in the Unicode standard:

• combines with digits

U+0F19 TIBETAN ASTROLOGICAL SIGN SDONG TSHUGS

Description in the Unicode standard:

• combines with digits

U+0F1A TIBETAN SIGN RDEL DKAR GCIG

Tibetan astrological symbol

The characters in the range U+0F1A-0F1F and U+0FCE-0FCF represent signs used in astrological almanacs. In Tibetan astrology groups of one, two or three black and white pebbles are used for purposes of divination. These are represented in astrological texts by hollow circles (representing white pebbles) and x-shaped crosses (representing black pebbles).

U+0F1B TIBETAN SIGN RDEL DKAR GNYIS

Tibetan astrological symbol

The characters in the range U+0F1A-0F1F and U+0FCE-0FCF represent signs used in astrological almanacs. In Tibetan astrology groups of one, two or three black and white pebbles are used for purposes of divination. These are represented in astrological texts by hollow circles (representing white pebbles) and x-shaped crosses (representing black pebbles).

U+0F1C TIBETAN SIGN RDEL DKAR GSUM

Description in the Unicode standard:

→ (alchemical symbol for oil - 1F746)

Tibetan astrological symbol

The characters in the range U+0F1A-0F1F and U+0FCE-0FCF represent signs used in astrological almanacs. In Tibetan astrology groups of one, two or three black and white pebbles are used for purposes of divination. These are represented in astrological texts by hollow circles (representing white pebbles) and x-shaped crosses (representing black pebbles).

U+0F1D TIBETAN SIGN RDEL NAG GCIG

Tibetan astrological symbol

The characters in the range U+0F1A-0F1F and U+0FCE-0FCF represent signs used in astrological almanacs. In Tibetan astrology groups of one, two or three black and white pebbles are used for purposes of divination. These are represented in astrological texts by hollow circles (representing white pebbles) and x-shaped crosses (representing black pebbles).

U+0F1E TIBETAN SIGN RDEL NAG GNYIS

Tibetan astrological symbol

The characters in the range U+0F1A-0F1F and U+0FCE-0FCF represent signs used in astrological almanacs. In Tibetan astrology groups of one, two or three black and white pebbles are used for purposes of divination. These are represented in astrological texts by hollow circles (representing white pebbles) and x-shaped crosses (representing black pebbles).

U+0F1F TIBETAN SIGN RDEL DKAR RDEL NAG

Tibetan astrological symbol, signifying good luck earlier, bad luck later

The characters in the range U+0F1A-0F1F and U+0FCE-0FCF represent signs used in astrological almanacs. In Tibetan astrology groups of one, two or three black and white pebbles are used for purposes of divination. These are represented in astrological texts by hollow circles (representing white pebbles) and x-shaped crosses (representing black pebbles).

U+0FCE TIBETAN SIGN RDEL NAG RDEL DKAR

Description in the Unicode standard:

= dena deka
• signifies good luck earlier, bad luck later

Tibetan astrological symbol, signifying bad luck earlier, good luck later

The characters in the range U+0F1A-0F1F and U+0FCE-0FCF represent signs used in astrological almanacs. In Tibetan astrology groups of one, two or three black and white pebbles are used for purposes of divination. These are represented in astrological texts by hollow circles (representing white pebbles) and x-shaped crosses (representing black pebbles).

This particular combination doesn't occur in most astrological charts, because it is considered inauspicious, but does occur in some.

See this Unicode proposal for more information and examples.

Notes. Refs: Proposal to encode one Tibetan astrological character - revised

U+0FCF TIBETAN SIGN RDEL NAG GSUM

Tibetan astrological symbol

The characters in the range U+0F1A-0F1F and U+0FCE-0FCF represent signs used in astrological almanacs. In Tibetan astrology groups of one, two or three black and white pebbles are used for purposes of divination. These are represented in astrological texts by hollow circles (representing white pebbles) and x-shaped crosses (representing black pebbles).

U+0F3E TIBETAN SIGN YAR TSHES

Tibetan punctuation

Paired with U+0F3F TIBETAN SIGN MAR TSHES ༿ in combination with digits.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, Formatting rules for Tibetan text

༿

U+0F3F TIBETAN SIGN MAR TSHES

Description in the Unicode standard:

• marks which combine with digits

Tibetan punctuation

Paired with U+0F3E TIBETAN SIGN YAR TSHES in combination with digits.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, pp325-344, Formatting rules for Tibetan text

Cantillation signs

U+0FC0 TIBETAN CANTILLATION SIGN HEAVY BEAT

Description in the Unicode standard:

• marks a heavy drum beat

U+0FC1 TIBETAN CANTILLATION SIGN LIGHT BEAT

Description in the Unicode standard:

• marks a light drum beat

U+0FC2 TIBETAN CANTILLATION SIGN CANG TE-U

Description in the Unicode standard:

• symbol of a small Tibetan hand drum

U+0FC3 TIBETAN CANTILLATION SIGN SBUB -CHAL

Description in the Unicode standard:

• symbol of a Tibetan cymbal

Symbols

U+0FC4 TIBETAN SYMBOL DRIL BU

Description in the Unicode standard:

• symbol of a Tibetan hand bell
→ (bell - 1F514)

U+0FC5 TIBETAN SYMBOL RDO RJE

U+0FC6 TIBETAN SYMBOL PADMA GDAN

Tibetan combining symbol

May combine with letters or other symbols. It is typed after the sequence with which it combines.


Source

U+0FC7 TIBETAN SYMBOL RDO RJE RGYA GRAM

U+0FC8 TIBETAN SYMBOL PHUR PA

U+0FC9 TIBETAN SYMBOL NOR BU

U+0FCA TIBETAN SYMBOL NOR BU NYIS -KHYIL

Description in the Unicode standard:

• the double body symbol
→ (yin yang - 262F)

U+0FCB TIBETAN SYMBOL NOR BU GSUM -KHYIL

Description in the Unicode standard:

• the tri-kaya or triple body symbol

U+0FCC TIBETAN SYMBOL NOR BU BZHI -KHYIL

Description in the Unicode standard:

• the quadruple body symbol, a form of the svasti sign
→ (left-facing svasti sign - 0FD6)

Tibetan svasti sign

This is a Tibetan-specific version of U+0FD6 LEFT-FACING SVASTI SIGN .

The svasti signs encoded in the range U+0FD5 to U+0FD8 are considered symbols of good luck and well being. They are widely used sacred symbols in hinduism, buddhism and jainism, and are used religious texts, marriage invitations, and decorations. They are also used on religious flags in jainism, and buddist temples. On maps throughout Asia they mark the location of buddhist temples. The dotted forms are often used in the hindu tradition in India.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2

Religious symbols

U+0FD5 RIGHT-FACING SVASTI SIGN

Description in the Unicode standard:

= gyung drung nang -khor
• symbol of good luck and well-being in India
→ 5350

Tibetan svasti sign, gyung drung nang -khor

The svasti signs encoded in the range U+0FD5 to U+0FD8 are considered symbols of good luck and well being. They are widely used sacred symbols in hinduism, buddhism and jainism, and are used religious texts, marriage invitations, and decorations. They are also used on religious flags in jainism, and buddist temples. On maps throughout Asia they mark the location of buddhist temples. The dotted forms are often used in the hindu tradition in India.

These characters are located in the Tibetan block, but are intended for general use in other Asian scripts.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Proposal to encode four religious characters in the Tibetan block of the UCS

U+0FD6 LEFT-FACING SVASTI SIGN

Description in the Unicode standard:

= gyung drung phyi -khor
→ 534D

Tibetan svasti sign, gyung drung phyi -khor

The svasti signs encoded in the range U+0FD5 to U+0FD8 are considered symbols of good luck and well being. They are widely used sacred symbols in hinduism, buddhism and jainism, and are used religious texts, marriage invitations, and decorations. They are also used on religious flags in jainism, and buddist temples. On maps throughout Asia they mark the location of buddhist temples. The dotted forms are often used in the hindu tradition in India.

These characters are located in the Tibetan block, but are intended for general use in other Asian scripts.

See also U+0FCC TIBETAN SYMBOL NOR BU BZHI -KHYIL , which is a specifically Tibetan version of this sign.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Proposal to encode four religious characters in the Tibetan block of the UCS

U+0FD7 RIGHT-FACING SVASTI SIGN WITH DOTS

Description in the Unicode standard:

= gyung drung nang -khor bzhi mig can

Tibetan svasti sign, gyung drung nang -khor bzhi mig can

The svasti signs encoded in the range U+0FD5 to U+0FD8 are considered symbols of good luck and well being. They are widely used sacred symbols in hinduism, buddhism and jainism, and are used religious texts, marriage invitations, and decorations. They are also used on religious flags in jainism, and buddist temples. On maps throughout Asia they mark the location of buddhist temples. The dotted forms are often used in the hindu tradition in India.

These characters are located in the Tibetan block, but are intended for general use in other Asian scripts.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Proposal to encode four religious characters in the Tibetan block of the UCS

U+0FD8 LEFT-FACING SVASTI SIGN WITH DOTS

Description in the Unicode standard:

= gyung drung phyi -khor bzhi mig can

Tibetan svasti sign, gyung drung phyi -khor bzhi mig can

The svasti signs encoded in the range U+0FD5 to U+0FD8 are considered symbols of good luck and well being. They are widely used sacred symbols in hinduism, buddhism and jainism, and are used religious texts, marriage invitations, and decorations. They are also used on religious flags in jainism, and buddist temples. On maps throughout Asia they mark the location of buddhist temples. The dotted forms are often used in the hindu tradition in India.

These characters are located in the Tibetan block, but are intended for general use in other Asian scripts.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Proposal to encode four religious characters in the Tibetan block of the UCS

Annotation marks

U+0FD9 TIBETAN MARK LEADING MCHAN RTAGS

U+0FDA TIBETAN MARK TRAILING MCHAN RTAGS

Digits

U+0F20 TIBETAN DIGIT ZERO

U+0F21 TIBETAN DIGIT ONE

U+0F22 TIBETAN DIGIT TWO

U+0F23 TIBETAN DIGIT THREE

U+0F24 TIBETAN DIGIT FOUR

U+0F25 TIBETAN DIGIT FIVE

U+0F26 TIBETAN DIGIT SIX

U+0F27 TIBETAN DIGIT SEVEN

U+0F28 TIBETAN DIGIT EIGHT

U+0F29 TIBETAN DIGIT NINE

Digits minus half

U+0F2A TIBETAN DIGIT HALF ONE

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 0.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F2B TIBETAN DIGIT HALF TWO

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 1.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F2C TIBETAN DIGIT HALF THREE

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 2.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F2D TIBETAN DIGIT HALF FOUR

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 3.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F2E TIBETAN DIGIT HALF FIVE

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 4.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F2F TIBETAN DIGIT HALF SIX

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 5.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F30 TIBETAN DIGIT HALF SEVEN

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 6.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F31 TIBETAN DIGIT HALF EIGHT

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 7.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F32 TIBETAN DIGIT HALF NINE

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 8.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

U+0F33 TIBETAN DIGIT HALF ZERO

Tibetan number

The usage is not certain. By some interpretations, this has the value of 9.5. Used only in some traditional contexts, these appear as the last digit of a multidigit number, eg. ༤༬ represents 42.5. These are very rarely used, however, and other uses have been postulated.

Notes. Refs: The Unicode Standard 6.3, p331-2, Numbers that Don't Add Up : Tibetan Half Digits

Further reading

  1. [Daniels] Peter T. Daniels and William Bright, The World's Writing Systems, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-507993-0
  2. [LanguageStudent] The Tibetan Language Student
  3. [Unicode] The Unicode Standard v6.3, Tibetan.
  4. [Formatting] Formatting rules for Tibetan text
First published 3 Feb 2014. This version 2016-03-11 10:38 GMT.  •  Copyright r12a@w3.org. Licence CC-By.