Old Norse picker notes/help

Updated 25-Feb-2018 • tags apps, pickers, oldnorse

This Unicode character picker allows you to produce or analyse runs of Old Norse text. Character pickers are especially useful for people who don't know a script well, as characters are displayed in ways that aid identification.

If something is broken or missing raise an issue. For version information see the Github commit list.

About the chart

Includes characters that are used for writing Old Norse.

In addition to helping you to type Old Norse latin-based text, the picker allows you to automatically generate phonetic and runic transcriptions. These should be used with caution! The phonetic transcriptions are only intended to be a rough guide, and real-life runic text is often highly idiosyncratic, not to mention that it varies depending on the time period.

The runic transcription tools in this app produce runes of the Younger fuþark – used for Old Norse after the Elder and before the Medieval fuþarks. This transcription tool has its own idiosyncracies, that may not always match real-life usage of runes. One particular idiosyncracy is that the output always regularly conforms to the same set of rules, but others include the inability to produce things such as ligatures (bind-runes), and the decision not to remove homorganic nasals before certain following letters. More information about this is given below.

Note that there is also a Runic picker, which deals with conventional latin transliterations, and includes characters from a wider range of fuþarks. 

Controls above the text area

Old Norse to IPA. This produces a very rough phonemic transcription of the highlighted text in the box. The transcription appears just below the input box, where you can copy it, move it into the input box at the caret, or delete it. The transcription is generated using rules from A New Introduction to Old Norse.

Old Norse to LB Runes. This produces a runic transcription from Old Norse standardised orthography or from the standardised Latin transcription of runes. It produces a transcription using the long branch variant of the younger fuþark. Specific features of the transcription include the following:

Old Norse to ST Runes. This produces a runic transcription from Old Norse standardised orthography or from the standardised Latin transcription of runes into the short twig variant of the younger fuþark. Specific features of the transcription are the same as those for the long branch transcription.

Transcribe from NION. The online PDF version of A New Introduction to Old Norse has strange encoding quirks, for example representing ð as › and þ as fl. If you copy paste text from the PDF into the output box, you can use this feature to convert the text into Unicode. One warning: fi is converted to Þ, but occasionally it is meant to represent fi.

Glossary lookup. Basically, this does the opposite of the previous feature, converting Unicode to a form that will match entries in the New Introduction to Old Norse glossary. It also opens the glossary page in a separate window. Unfortunately, the search parameter in the URL doesn't take you to the exact location needed in the document, but you could pick up the text from the URL to use for a search.

Input aids

IPA transcription. Displays a panel of characters you may need while typing in an IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) transcription from the keyboard. Where there are multiple possible choices, these choices are presented in a small pop-up box; click on the choice you want in order to add it to the text area.

Show case endings. Clicking on this reveals a tool that summarises basic noun case endings in Old Norse. Mouse over the ending of a noun and it will indicate some possible cases that it represents. Of course, this is very simplistic.

Copyright r12a@w3.org. Licence CC-By.